Dry-Eye Disease

Summary: Preventive and curative paradigms of DED treatment can be modeled in vivo by exposure to a combination of the SiccaSystem environment and transdermic administration of scopolamine.

Model Description

Dry-eye disease (or Keratoconjunctivitis sicca; DED) is defined by the International Dry Eye Workshop (DEWS) as a multifactorial disease of the ocular surface characterized by a loss of homeostasis of the tear film, and accompanied by ocular symptoms, in which tear film instability and hyperosmolarity, ocular surface inflammation and damage, and neurosensory abnormalities play etiological roles. 

Dry-eye disease is induced in mice by exposure to a controlled desiccating environment (SiccaSystemTM, K&P Scientific LLC, Oak Park, IL) and transdermal scopolamine administration (Novartis, Basel, Switzerland). 

At Experimentica, we offer validated prophylactic and therapeutic paradigms of the experimental study design. 

Animal speciesMice
Method of inductionDesiccating stress/ scopolamine
Follow-up periodTypically 2 – 3 weeks
Route of compound administrationTopical, systemic
Read-outs1. Tear volume measurement;
2. Corneal fluorescein staining;
3. Lacrimal gland pathology;
4. Quantification of conjunctival goblet cells;
5. Corneal morphology.

Outcomes and Read-Outs 

Representative Example of Quantification of Corneal Surface Damage and Inflammation. 

Fig. 1. We recommend using Restasis® (0.05% ophthalmic cyclosporine emulsion) as reference compound that provides benchmark values for comparison of the efficacy of test compounds.
Fig. 1. We recommend using Restasis® (0.05% ophthalmic cyclosporine emulsion) as reference compound that provides benchmark values for comparison of the efficacy of test compounds. Representative images from an untreated mouse with dry-eye disease induction is shown on the left. Restasis® significantly reduces dry-eye induced corneal surface damage compared to the untreated eye. Data are shown as median interquartile range. 

Authors' picture